Interview With Susan Barton - "More things you can do at home to help your child with dyslexia"

November 04, 2016

In a previous interview with Susan Barton we talked about different strategies to help dyslexic children at home. Today’s interview builds upon what we discussed previously to offer you specific strategies and tidbits.

Ms. Barton is a frequent and popular speaker at conferences focusing on Dyslexia, Reading Instruction, Early Intervention and RTI, and Adult Literacy issues. Susan is also an instructor of Phonemic Awareness and Multisensory Teaching Techniques through the University of California, of Learning Disabilities at West Valley College, and of the graduate-level courses Screening for Dyslexia, Tutoring People with Dyslexia, and Understanding Dyslexia and ADHD through the University of San Diego.

In the past few years, Susan has presented at these conferences: the American Speech Hearing Association’s national conference, the Learning Disabilities national conference, the Canadian Dyslexia Association, the Oregon branch of the International Dyslexia Association, California Literacy, many regional and statewide conferences of the International Reading Association, many regional and statewide conferences for the Association for Christian Schools International, the California and Arizona Charter Schools conferences, the California Association of School Psychologists, the California Kindergarten conference, and the Early Childhood Educators conference, to name just a few.

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  • Cynthia
    April 13, 2020 at 4:58 am

    Dr. Barton's insights on approaching issues in children with learning disabilities were really eye opening and very informative. She says that it's important to let […] Read MoreDr. Barton's insights on approaching issues in children with learning disabilities were really eye opening and very informative. She says that it's important to let the child know the cause behind his learning difficulty so it's reassuring for him to know that its a problem that can be fixed. However, what if the child uses Dyslexia or ADHD to his advantage by constantly giving it as an excuse and gives up without even trying? Read Less

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    • Richard Selznick, Ph.D.
      @Cynthia
      April 17, 2020 at 10:29 am

      Great question, Cynthia, and one that I struggle with continually - Are we accommodating too much? Are we doing too much and not expecting […] Read MoreGreat question, Cynthia, and one that I struggle with continually - Are we accommodating too much? Are we doing too much and not expecting the child to step-up. These are very tough questions to answer. My blog that comes out today starts that theme over the next few weeks. Many of my prior blogs have also touched on this theme. Read Less

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